« Back to TED.com

Program Speakers A-Z

A
Grimanesa Amorós image Grimanesa Amorós
Interdisciplinary artist

The work of Grimanesa Amorós highlights unexpected continuities between ancient culture, landscapes and 21st-century technology.

When it was unveiled at Issey Miyake headquarters in New York in 2011, people referred to “Uros” as “the bubbles.” It was an unusually apt nickname for Peruvian artist Grimanesa Amorós’s pulsating installation piece. Built from translucent plastic “diffusion material” illuminated by carefully wired and sequenced LED arrays, the work features glowing hemispheres that evoke the floating islands built by the Uros people of Lake Titicaca. Crafted from reeds, these islands floated on the gas bubbles released as their submerged portion decomposed.

In her subsequent work, Amorós has returned often to the theme of the Uros islands, with installations in places such as Times Square in New York and the Venice Biennale, playing with the connection between science and culture, and between technology and the past.

Session 5: Urban Canvas
Wed Oct 8, 2014
11:30 – 1:20
Marie Arana image Marie Arana
Biographer and literary critic

Peru-born author Marie Arana has cultural roots in both Americas, a perspective she brings to her latest work, a remarkable biography of Simón Bolívar.

Marie Arana is a synthesis of Peruvian tradition and American self-invention. She arrived in the United States from Peru as a nine-year-old and went on to become a leader in the New York publishing world, then one of Washingtonian Magazine’s “Most Powerful People in Washington” as editor in chief of the Washington Post’s books section.

She has written two novels, Cellophane and Lima Nights, both set in Peru, and the script for the South American portion of the documentary Girl Rising. Her latest book, a biography, examines the life of Simón Bolívar for what it reveals about South America today.
Session 1: Stories
Tues Oct 7, 2014
11:30 – 1:00
Alejandro Aravena image Alejandro Aravena
Urban architect

Alejandro Aravena works inside paradoxes, seeing space and flexibility in public housing, clarity in economic scarcity, and the keys to rebuilding in the causes of natural disasters. He

Throughout his career, Alejandro Aravena has grappled with what he calls the “double condition of cities.” Attracting people, knowledge, development and opportunities on one hand, the Chilean architect says cities also concentrate and magnify social pressures.

Through Elemental, the firm he founded in 1994, Aravena has devoted as much time to the design of iconic structures like the San Joaquin Universidad Catolica's “Siamese Towers” and Santiago’s Metropolitan Park as he has to the design of flexible and beautiful low-cost housing for low-income families. The firm's work is not just about buildings, but about shaping lives.

Aravena is the winner of the 2016 Pritzker Prize.

Session 10: Lateral Action
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Severine Autesserre image Severine Autesserre
Peace and conflict researcher

Severine Autesserre traces civil war and endemic violence to its roots, and its resolution, in local and interpersonal conflicts.

For Barnard College, Columbia University political science professor Severine Autesserre, solutions to large-scale instability and widespread violence aren’t devised in the academy or mapped out internationally. They’re negotiated, village by village, with the people affected.
 
Calling for a far greater attention to a bottom-up approach to peacebuilding, along with more top-down ways, the author of The Trouble with Congo (and the recent Peaceland) shows that resolving local disputes over land, resources and political power is key to securing the long-term stability of countries.
Session 4: Field Work
Wed Oct 8, 2014
9:00 – 10:40
Tasso Azevedo image Tasso Azevedo
Forester and sustainability activist

Tasso Azevedo has helped reduce the rate of deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest by 75 percent — and inspired similar efforts around the world.

Tasso Azevedo founded the Brazilian non-governmental organization Imaflora in 1995 to create alternatives to deforestation. It became the leading environmental certification institution in Brazil. In 2003 he was appointed as the first director general of Brazil's National Forest Service.

In that job, by showing how the health of the Amazon rainforest is directly connected to his country’s economic stability and energy security, he led the implementation of an innovative framework of incentives for sustainable forestry that contributed to reduce the ate of deforestation in the Amazon by 75 percent -- and Brazil's greenhouse gas emissions by one-third. Today, Azevedo is focused on addressing climate change globally.

Session 7: Blueprints
Wed Oct 8, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
B
Rodrigo Baggio image Rodrigo Baggio
Digital inclusionist

Access to technology is quickly becoming a human right. At the Center for Digital Inclusion, Rodrigo Baggio works to narrow the digital divide.

In the early 1990s, Rodrigo Baggio looked ahead and saw a problem: As computers and digital technology became increasingly central to life, business and politics, poor communities without access to tech were at risk of being left even further behind. In 1995 he founded the Comitê para Democratização da Informática in Rio, a community center full of computers, gadgets and connections. His plan was to teach marginalized communities  -- youth, the homeless and others -- how to use tech tools.
 
The pilot center was an explosive success; today, CDI helps run nearly 800 centers based in schools, clinics and communities in 12 more countries, from Ecuador to England to Jordan. He also thinks carefully about the larger question of empowerment, pegging it on a five-steps methodology: understand an issue; identify the problem; design a solution; take action; evaluate.
Session 6: Empowering Tech
Wed Oct 8, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
Laura Boushnak image Laura Boushnak
Photographer

Laura Boushnak is a Kuwaiti-born Palestinian photographer whose work focuses on women, literacy and education reform in the Arab world.

Boushnak's documentary project I Read I Write explores the barriers women face accessing education and the role of literacy in improving the lives of women in Egypt, Yemen, Kuwait, Jordan, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia. For the project, Boushnak encouraged women to write their thoughts on prints of their portraits, engaging them directly in the artistic process. Boushnak’s images have been widely published, and her work has been exhibited in museums and galleries around the world. She is a co-founder of Rawiya, a collective that brings together the work and experience of female photographers from the Middle East.

TED Fellows Talks: Session 1
Mon Oct 6, 2014
12:00 – 1:30
Khalida Brohi image Khalida Brohi
Women’s rights activist and entrepreneur

In the tribal region where she was born, Khalida Brohi founded an organization to end honor killings and empower Pakistani women.

When she was a teenager in the Balochistan region of Pakistan, Khalida Brohi witnessed the honor killing of her friend, who had married for love. Today, she's the founder and executive director of the Sughar Empowerment Society. The nonprofit, whose name means "skilled and confident woman", provides Pakistani tribal women with the education, skills, and income opportunities to empower them to take a leadership role in their households, their communities, and the world.

As she works to reduce endemic violence against women at substantial personal risk, she says, "Not doing this work would kill me. Doing this work would keep me alive.”
Session 10: Lateral Action
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
C
Casuarina image Casuarina
Samba band

Casuarina is one of the most respected modern samba bands of Brazil.

Samba is more of a musical family than a specific genre, for it is rich in different accents: the bossa nova, the samba from Bahia, the rhythms of the Nordeste, the "samba de mesa." The music of Casuarina incorporates all of them, flirting also with pop and urban music.
 
Born a dozen years ago in Lapa, the bohemian neighborhood of Rio, Casuarina is part of a new samba renaissance that has spread in the past few years. In addition to their own compositions, Casuarina creates original and sophisticated arrangements of a repertory of classic Brazilian sambas. The group is composed of Daniel Montes (seven-string guitar and arrangements), Gabriel Azevedo (tambourine and lead vocalist), João Cavalcanti (tan-tan and lead vocalist), João Fernando (mandolin, backing vocalist and arrangements) and Rafael Freire (cavaquinho and backing vocalist).
Session 7: Blueprints
Wed Oct 8, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Circle of Sound image Circle of Sound
World music duo

As the duo Circle of Sound, Soumik Datta and Bernhard Schimpelsberger integrate influence and instruments across cultures -- pinned together by Indian rhythm. Call it “Indo-rock opera.”

Soumik Datta is a virtuoso of the 19-stringed sarod, a fretless, lute-like instrument traditional in northern India, Pakistan and Bangladesh that’s notable for its harmonic and drone sounds. Meanwhile, Bernhard Schimpelsberger, from Austria, has developed an idiosyncratic drumming style, playing Indian rhythms on a heavily customized western-style kit.

Each musician has a solo career -- but together, as Circle of Sound, they synthesize rock and electronic music, Western and Indian classical styles, into a rocking, hypnotic mix propelled by Indian rhythms, which Schimpelsberger has called “the most profound rhythmic system in the world.”

Session 4: Field Work
Wed Oct 8, 2014
9:00 – 10:40
Teresa Corção image Teresa Corção
Chef and heritage food educator

Brazilian chef Teresa Corção founded the Maniva Institute to reinvigorate her country's connection with its food heritage—starting with manioc.

Manioc (elsewhere called yucca, cassava, tapioca, or mogo), is both humble and endlessly versatile. For Teresa Corção, the self-taught chef-owner of celebrated restaurant O Navegador in Rio de Janeiro, these characteristics made the staple tuber a perfect ingredient to anchor her campaign to revitalize Brazilian food culture.
 
Through her work as founder of the Maniva Institute, she has worked to champion biodiversity among Brazilian farmers, improve nutrition, and inspire reverence for food as culture and memory.
Session 9: Basic Needs
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
2:45 – 4:25
Fabien Cousteau image Fabien Cousteau
Ocean explorer and environmentalist

Fabien Cousteau spent 31 days underwater to research how climate change and pollution are affecting the oceans.

For 31 days, from June 1 to July 2, 2014, Fabien Cousteau and a team of scientists and filmmakers lived and worked 20 meters below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean, at the Acquarius underwater science lab 9 miles off the coast of Florida. The intent of Mission31: study the life of and on the coral reef -- and the effects of climate change, acidification, and pollution, in particular by plastic debris and oil spills. But it was also a study of the scientists themselves spending extended time underwater. By stayigng down continuously, they collected the equivalent of several years of scientific data in just a month.

50 years ago Fabien Cousteau's grandfather, the legendary ocean explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau, led a similar -- but shorter by one day -- expedition under the surface of the Red Sea. Since, we have explored only a very small portion of the oceans, less than 5 percent.
Session 12: Mighty Spaces
Fri Oct 10, 2014
11:30 – 1:00
Catherine Crump image Catherine Crump
Attorney + privacy advocate

Catherine Crump is an assistant clinical professor at Berkeley Law School who focuses on the laws around data and surveillance.

Catherine Crump is a civil liberties lawyer whose work focuses on combating government surveillance and protecting the free speech rights of political protesters. She has filed cases challenging the NSA and the Department of Homeland Security. Crump is an assistant professor at Berkeley Law School; previously she was an attorney for ACLU for nine years.

In her writing for the ACLU, Crump warns against the dangers of national mass surveillance technology, which can all too easily end up as tools for local police forces. She writes, "Not only our country as a whole, but also the police, will be better off in the long run if we have an open debate about what today’s technology can do, versus what it should do."

TED Fellows Talks: Session 1
Mon Oct 6, 2014
12:00 – 1:30
D
Juliana D'Agostini image Juliana D'Agostini
Pianist

A young classical pianist, Juliana D’Agostini is known for technical virtuosity and a fresh, engaging style.

The life of a young classical pianist can be quite international, with global competitions setting the stage for a career of worldwide halls and hotel rooms. But Juliana D’Agostini, a rising star of Brazil's classical scene, has instead leaned into her Brazilian identity, and not just by playing Villa-Lobos on two of her three albums.

A graduate of the University of São Paulo (where she modeled to pay for her studies) who has also studied in France and in the United States, D'Agostini is known both for her classical technique and her fresh readings of Chopin and Grieg, and has been tipped as a talent to watch.
Session 9: Basic Needs
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
2:45 – 4:25
Sangu Delle image Sangu Delle
Investor

Sangu Delle is an entrepreneur and clean water activist. A TED Fellow who hails from Ghana, he sees incredible potential in the African economy.

Traditional aid and microfinance platforms have good intentions, says Ghanaian investor Sangu Delle, but they largely haven’t worked. This TED Fellow proposes a different way: investing in pan-African entrepreneurial titans. Through Golden Palm Investments, the investment company he founded, Delle focuses on supporting smart businesses in Africa with big ambitions. GPI focuses on high growth industries and has funded promising startups like SOLO Mobile in Nigeria, mPharma in Ghana and Stawi Foods in Kenya. Because instead of lending small amounts to 500 farmers who’ll each make a small percentage more as a result, he’d rather lend a huge amount to one world class company with the ability to employ 500 people — and perhaps many more. Africa has a market of one billion people and, with more high-impact businesses, could quickly outpace other emerging economies, he says.

Sangu is the author of the upcoming book, Seeding Growth: Africa’s Youngest Entrepreneurs. He is also the co- founder of cleanacwa, a non-profit in Ghana that supports water and sanitation as basic human rights, and that is currently serving about 120 villages. In 2014, Delle was named one of Forbes magazine's “30 Most Promising Young Entrepreneurs in Africa.” 

TED Fellows Talks: Session 2
Mon Oct 6, 2014
2:45 – 4:15
F
Melissa Fleming image Melissa Fleming
Voice for refugees

As head of communications for the UN's High Commissioner for Refugees, Melissa Fleming sheds light on their devastating plight and remarkable resilience.

Almost 60 million people in the world today have been forcefully displaced from their home - a level not seen since WWII. As many as four million Syrian refugees have sought refuge in neighboring countries. In Lebanon, half of these refugees are children; only 20 percent are in school. Melissa Fleming of the UN's refugee agency calls on all of us to make sure that refugee camps are healing places where people can develop the skills they'll need to rebuild their hometowns. Investing in this, she says, may well be the most effective relief effort there is. This inspires her and the teams at the UN's High Commissioner for Refugees to tell stories of the individuals who are displaced. 

Session 7: Blueprints
Wed Oct 8, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Wendy Freedman image Wendy Freedman
Astronomer

Wendy Freedman led the construction of the Giant Magellan Telescope, a massive earthbound observatory.

Wendy Freedman and her colleagues raced to build the world’s first next-generation telescope. The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), in northern Chile, is one of three mega-telescopes currently under construction in the Atacama desert region (The others are the ALMA and the European Extremely Large Telescope, E-ELT).
 
The GMT will have 10 times more resolution than the Hubble Space Telescope. When it is finished, Freedman could be among those who answer one of astronomy’s greatest riddles: are there any other Earth-like planets out there? No stranger to big questions, Freedman and her colleagues at the Carnegie Observatories are also refining the measurement of the Hubble Constant, which could change our understanding of the speed of our expanding universe.
Session 8: Lenses
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
11:30 – 1:10
G
Misha Glenny image Misha Glenny
Underworld investigator

Journalist Misha Glenny leaves no stone unturned (and no failed state unexamined) in his excavation of criminal globalization.

In minute detail, Misha Glenny's 2008 book McMafia illuminates the byzantine outlines of global organized crime. Whether it's pot smugglers in British Columbia, oil/weapons/people traffickers in Eastern Europe, Japanese yakuza or Nigerian scammers, to research this magisterial work Glenny penetrated the convoluted, globalized and franchised modern underworld -- often at considerable personal risk.

The book that resulted is an exhaustive look at an unseen industry that Glenny believes may account for 15% of the world's GDP.

Legal society ignores this world at its peril, but Glenny suggests that conventional law enforcement might not be able to combat a problem whose roots lie in global instability.

While covering the Central Europe beat for the Guardian and the BBC, Glenny wrote several acclaimed books on the fall of Yugoslavia and the rise of the Balkan nations. He's researching a new book on cybercrime, of which he says: "The key to cybercrime is what we call social engineering. Or to use the technical term for it, there's one born every minute."

Watch TED's exclusive video Q&A with Glenny: "Behind the Scenes of McMafia" >>

Session 10: Lateral Action
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Charmian Gooch image Charmian Gooch
Anti-corruption activist

Charmian Gooch is the 2014 TED Prize winner. At Global Witness, she exposes how a global architecture of corruption is woven into the extraction and exploitation of natural resources.

Charmian Gooch co-founded the watchdog NGO Global Witness with colleagues Simon Taylor and Patrick Alley in 1993, in response to growing concerns over covert warfare funded by illicit trade. Since then, Global Witness has captured headlines for their exposé of "blood diamonds" in Uganda, of mineral exploitation in the Congo, of illegal timber trade between Cambodia and Thailand, and more. With unique expertise on the shadowy threads connecting corrupt businesses and governments, Global Witness continues its quest to uncover and root out the sources of exploitation.

In 2014, Gooch and Global Witness were awarded the $1 million TED Prize, along with the Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship, for their campaign to end anonymous companies. Gooch's TED Prize wish: for us to know who ultimately owns and controls companies and launch a new era of openness in business. Global Witness highlighted the importance of this issue in an investigation, aired on 60 Minutes, where they sent an undercover investigator into 13 New York law firms. The investigator posed as an adviser to a government minister in Africa and asked for thoughts on how to move money into the United States for a plane, a yacht and a brownstone. All but one firm offered advice. 

The Panama Papers, released in April of 2016, further demonstrate the need for transparency. The papers paint a picture of how the rich and powerful around the world use offshore accounts and anonymous companies to move money. "This secretive world is being opened up to global public scrutiny," said Gooch, on the day the papers were released.

 

Session 4: Field Work
Wed Oct 8, 2014
9:00 – 10:40
Jon Gosier image Jon Gosier
Investor, data scientist, entrepreneur

Jon Gosier is a serial tech entrepreneur and early-stage startup investor. In 2015, Time magazine listed him as one of the "12 New Faces of Black Leadership."

Jon Gosier is an investor and data scientist. He's a partner at Third Cohort Capital, an early-stage tech startup investment fund. Prior to joining Third Cohort, he was the founder of Appfrica, which invests in Africa’s technology economy, D8A Group, a company that makes data science solutions, and Market Atlas, which is like the Bloomberg terminal for emerging market countries. In 2015, Gosier was listed by TIME Magazine as one of “12 New Faces of Black Leadership”, as well as “Most Influential Blacks in Technology” by Business Insider in 2013 and 2014 and among the "20 Angels Worth Knowing" by Black Enterprise Magazine.

Gosier is a Fellow and Senior Fellow at TED from 2009 to 2012 and  a first-year participant at THNK, the Amsterdam School for Creative Leadership in the Netherlands. He's won the Knight News Challenge twice, once in 2011 for work in analysis at Ushahidi and again in 2012 for work creating ways of moving data between mobile phones without a central mobile network.

TED University
Tues Oct 7, 2014
9:00 – 10:30
Michael Green image Michael Green
Social progress expert

Michael Green is part of the team that has created the Social Progress Index, a standard to rank societies based on how they meet the needs of citizens.

In his book Philanthrocapitalism (co-authored with Economist business editor Matthew Bishop), Michael Green defined a new model for social change built on partnerships between wealthy businesses, governments and community organizations. Shortly thereafter, Bishop floated the idea of a “Social Competiveness Index,” the idea that one day countries would compete with one another to be the most socially advanced, in the same way as they now compete to be economic top dog. Green loved it and decided to turn it into reality.

Teaming up with Avina's president Brizio Biondi-Morra, Sally Osberg of the Skoll Foundation and many other thought leaders from businesses and foundations, he began work on what would become the Social Progress Imperative, of which he's now CEO. Later they were joined by Harvard management guru Michael E. Porter, who became chairman of the SPI's advisory board. The first Social Progress Index was published in 2014.

Session 7: Blueprints
Wed Oct 8, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Glenn Greenwald image Glenn Greenwald
Journalist

Glenn Greenwald is the journalist who has done the most to expose and explain the Edward Snowden files.

As one of the first journalists privy to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden’s archives, Glenn Greenwald has a unique window into the inner workings of the NSA and Britain's GCHQ. A vocal advocate for civil liberties in the face of growing post-9/11 authoritarianism, Greenwald was a natural outlet for Snowden, who’d admired his combative writing style in Salon and elsewhere.

Since his original Guardian exposés of Snowden’s revelations, Pulitzer winner Greenwald continues to stoke public debate on surveillance and privacy both in the media, on The Intercept, and with his new book No Place to Hide -- and suggests that the there are more shocking revelations to come.

Session 2: Digital Reboot
Tues Oct 7, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
Grupo TEDx image Grupo TEDx
Argentinian cumbia band

Ever wondered what a TED Talk would sound like set to music? Grupo TEDx has the answer.

To promote last year's TEDxBuenosAires conference, organizer Juan Martin Lutteral and his team, acting on an idea by Argentinian ad creatives Javier Mentasti and Maximiliano Maddalena, brought together seven musicians with a passion for TED Talks, and asked them to craft songs based on some of their favorites.

And so the artists Roberto Ismael "Tito" Silvetti, Nicolas Radicchi, Nicolas Cattáneo, Rodolfo David Salazar (aka. Angel Ugarte), Mariana Guazzelli, Joaquín Maia and Fernando Cesar "Yeye" Lopez, together with producer Santiago Inglese, selected several talks about innovation, architecture, design, sports and cities and set them to the popular rhythms of cumbia. They played about 30 shows around town, reaching tens of thousands of people. "Every song brings out an idea that we thought would inspire Latin American people the most," says Mentasti.
Session 3: Crossing Borders
Tues Oct 7, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Ameenah Gurib-Fakim image Ameenah Gurib-Fakim
Biodiversity scientist

Ameenah Gurib-Fakim explores the medical and nutrition secrets of the plants of her island, Mauritius.

She calls herself a chemist and a gardener (and she has a collection of 200 bonsai), but Ameenah Gurib-Fakim is the leading scientist studying the flora of one of the world's key biodiversity hotspots, the island of Mauritius. As the managing director of the Centre for Phytotherapy Research (Cephyr) and a professor of organic chemistry at the University of Mauritius, she explores and analyzes plants from the island and their health, nutritional and cosmetic applications.

She co-authored the African Herbal Pharmacopoeia, the first resource of its kind, led the first regional research project on the inventory and study of medicinal and aromatic plants of the Indian Ocean, and was the lead coordinating author on the international assessment of agricultural knowledge, science and technology for development, spearheaded by the World Bank. 

Ameenah was honored as one of Foreign Policy's 2015 Global Thinkers .

In June 2015, Ameenah Gurib-Fakim became the first female president of Mauritius.

Session 4: Field Work
Wed Oct 8, 2014
9:00 – 10:40
H
Haas&Hahn image Haas&Hahn
Favela painters

Working as Haas&Hahn, artists Jeroen Koolhaas and Dre Urhahn splash color onto urban walls -- and train young painters in the process.

It's an image seen around the world -- Praça Cantão, a square within the Santa Marta favela in Rio, blasted with stripes of rainbow colors that turn the jostling masonry walls into a brightly unified vision. Spurred on in 2010 by Dutch artists Jeroen Koolhaas and Dre Urhahn in collaboration with the local group "Tudo de cor para você", the painting was accomplished by 25 young people from the neighborhood, and reframed the square as a place of shared pride. The locals have since continued the project, with monthly painting task forces and other activities that have involved 800 people and transformed the aesthetic and the social psychology of the whole favela.
 
Known as "favela painters", Haas&Hahn have been working on community projects in Rio for almost 10 years. They've also worked in Haiti and Curaçao, and in 2011, they moved north into a tough neighborhood in northern Philadelphia, where they trained the Philly Painting crew to cover a worn-out commercial corridor in massive color blocks. They've returned to Rio in 2014 for a new project in the Vila Cruzeiro favela.
Session 5: Urban Canvas
Wed Oct 8, 2014
11:30 – 1:20
Meklit Hadero image Meklit Hadero
Singer-songwriter

Meklit Hadero is an Ethiopian-American singer-songwriter living the cultural in-between, both in her own luminous compositions and as a co-founder of the Nile Project.

Meklit Hadero's music is imbued with poetry and multiplicity, from hybridized sounds of Tizita (haunting and nostalgic music) drawing from her Ethiopian heritage, to the annals of jazz, folk songs and rock & roll. Hadero describes her music as emanating from “in-between spaces,” and the result is a smoky, evocative world peopled by strong bass, world instruments and her soothing voice.

In the Nile Project, founded along with Egyptian ethnomusicologist Mina Girgis, Hadero set out to explore the music of the Nile basin, pulling influences from countries along the river, from Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Sudan, and finally to Egypt. The project brings together hip-hop, traditional and contemporary music, with instruments and traditions old and new. As she says, "My work on a lot of levels is about multiplicity." Their new record is Aswan

About her own music, here's what people say:

“Soulful, tremulous and strangely cinematic, Meklit’s voice will implant scenes in your mind — a softly lit supperclub, a Brooklyn stoop, a sun-baked road. Close your eyes, listen and dream." -- Seattle Times

"Meklit… combines N.Y. jazz with West Coast folk and African flourishes, all bound together by her beguiling voice, which is part sunshine and part cloudy day.” -- Filter Magazine

Session 11: Fighters
Fri Oct 10, 2014
9:00 – 10:35
Meklit Hadero image Meklit Hadero
Singer-songwriter

Meklit Hadero is an Ethiopian-American singer-songwriter living the cultural in-between, both in her own luminous compositions and as a co-founder of the Nile Project.

Meklit Hadero's music is imbued with poetry and multiplicity, from hybridized sounds of Tizita (haunting and nostalgic music) drawing from her Ethiopian heritage, to the annals of jazz, folk songs and rock & roll. Hadero describes her music as emanating from “in-between spaces,” and the result is a smoky, evocative world peopled by strong bass, world instruments and her soothing voice.

In the Nile Project, founded along with Egyptian ethnomusicologist Mina Girgis, Hadero set out to explore the music of the Nile basin, pulling influences from countries along the river, from Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Sudan, and finally to Egypt. The project brings together hip-hop, traditional and contemporary music, with instruments and traditions old and new. As she says, "My work on a lot of levels is about multiplicity." Their new record is Aswan

About her own music, here's what people say:

“Soulful, tremulous and strangely cinematic, Meklit’s voice will implant scenes in your mind — a softly lit supperclub, a Brooklyn stoop, a sun-baked road. Close your eyes, listen and dream." -- Seattle Times

"Meklit… combines N.Y. jazz with West Coast folk and African flourishes, all bound together by her beguiling voice, which is part sunshine and part cloudy day.” -- Filter Magazine

Session 11: Fighters
Fri Oct 10, 2014
9:00 – 10:35
Constance Hockaday image Constance Hockaday
Artist + sailor

In creating large-scale, community-driven projects that float, artist Constance Hockaday comments on the use of public space, the phenomenon of gentrification, and the importance of universal access to waterways.

Artist Constance Hockaday grew up on the US-Mexico border, the daughter of a Chilean librarian mother and an American marine biologist father. “This has left me rich with skills for navigating cultural complexity … and the ocean,” she says. For nearly 15 years, Hockaday has immersed herself in outsider maritime projects. Through large-scale, community-driven art projects staged on the water, she couples her explorations of urban waterfronts with interrogations of queerness and belonging.

Hockaday's work has included helping to build a 50-foot catamaran with the nomadic collective Floating Neutrinos and a boat hotel on an abandoned marina in New York City. Most recently, she created a floating peep show in San Francisco that imagines the reopening of some of the city’s now shuttered iconic queer businesses. Her work comments on the use of public space, the phenomenon of gentrification, and the importance of universal access to public waterways.

Next up for Hockaday, the project Always Get on the Boat, to celebrate and mourn the San Francisco artist community of the Fifth Street Marina, which is being threatened by development along the Oakland waterfront.

TED Fellows Talks: Session 2
Mon Oct 6, 2014
2:45 – 4:15
Isabel Hoffmann image Isabel Hoffmann
Food technology entrepreneur

After learning her daughter’s mysterious and debilitating illness was related to food allergies, Isabel Hoffmann started developing technology that reveals exactly what’s in our food.

The food industry has long used spectroscopy to provide quick and accurate product analysis. Isabel Hoffmann wants to put that technology in the hands of everyone. With a new, crowdfunded device company, TellSpec, the entrepreneur plans to offer a pocket-sized spectrometer diners can use to scan their lunch for everything from protein content to calories. The device beams the scanned spectrum to a smartphone so the data can be immediately analyzed by a cloud-based mobile app.
 
The challenges of developing such a technology (and to make it pocket-size and low-cost) are many -- but the individual benefits in case of success would be substantial.
Session 9: Basic Needs
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
2:45 – 4:25
I
Susie Ibarra image Susie Ibarra
composer + improviser + percussionist educator

TED University
Tues Oct 7, 2014
9:00 – 10:30
Susie Ibarra image Susie Ibarra
composer + improviser + percussionist educator

TED University
Tues Oct 7, 2014
9:00 – 10:30
Chikwe Ihekweazu image Chikwe Ihekweazu
Epidemiologist

Chikwe Ihekweazu is an epidemiologist and public health expert who works on response to disease outbreaks.

Chikwe Ihekweazu is the Managing Partner of EpiAfric, a health consultancy firm that enables access to expertise in public health research. He is a medical epidemiologist and consultant in public health medicine; until recently he co-led the Centre for Tuberculosis at the South African National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa. Prior to this, he was a Consultant Regional Epidemiologist, working for the UK's Health Protection Agency, covering the South East region of England.

Dr. Ihekweazu has undertaken several short term consultancies for the World Health Organisation (WHO), mainly in response to major outbreaks and the design of surveillance systems, taking him to Geneva, Sudan, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Swaziland, Turkey and Nigeria. He is on the board of the Public Health Foundation of Nigeria, Society for Family Health, and Education as a Vaccine and coordinates the Nigerian Public Health Network.

He blogs at Nigeria Health Watch. He is a TEDGlobal Fellow.

Session 11: Fighters
Fri Oct 10, 2014
9:00 – 10:35
K
Syed Karim image Syed Karim
Internet datacaster

Social entrepreneur Syed Karim plans to make universal Internet access a reality through small satellites.

Syed Karim founded Outernet to broadcast digital content from a constellation of miniature satellites to areas where internet access is blocked or unavailable. If it’s successful, anyone with a smartphone, satellite dish or simple antenna could receive news, information, online education and entertainment from the sky.
 
Karim, who is also director of innovation for the Media Development Investment Fund, compares the vision to “modern shortwave radio” or “BitTorrent from space,” and expects to begin launching the satellites in early 2015.
Session 6: Empowering Tech
Wed Oct 8, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
Doreen Khoury image Doreen Khoury
Grassroots peace worker

A Middle East Liaison Officer for Hivos, an international development organization, Doreen Khoury engages with populations struggling to survive war and the disappearance of state structure.

Refugees fleeing a war-torn city face dire challenges. But what about those who stay behind? Based in Beirut but focused on Syria, Doreen Khouri works with people and organizations still inside cities like Aleppo and Raqqa as they struggle to carry on in the midst of civil war and in the absence of state structure.
Session 4: Field Work
Wed Oct 8, 2014
9:00 – 10:40
Alison Killing image Alison Killing
Architect

An architect and urban designer, Alison Killing uses journalism, filmmaking and exhibitions to help people better understand the built environment.

Alison Killing is an architect and urban designer working to engage people with their built environment, via design of buildings and urban strategies, film making, exhibitions and events. She explores the relationship between death and modern architecture, looking at how cities are rebuilt after disaster.

Recent projects include Death in the City (and its first iteration, Death in Venice, which was shown as an independent event during the opening week of the Venice Architecture Biennale), a touring exhibition about death and modern architecture; work with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies on better rebuilding after disaster and how to integrate relevant urban design tools into humanitarian response; and a study of financial models for arts and community projects temporarily using vacant buildings to help these projects become self-sustaining.

TED Fellows Talks: Session 2
Mon Oct 6, 2014
2:45 – 4:15
L
Joe Landolina image Joe Landolina
medical inventor

Joe Landolina is a TED Fellow and the inventor of VETI-GEL.

Joe Landolina is a TED Fellow and the inventor of a gel that can instantly stop traumatic bleeding -- without the need to apply pressure. He recently built a state of the art manufacturing facility in Brooklyn, New York to bring the product to market.
TED Fellows Talks: Session 2
Mon Oct 6, 2014
2:45 – 4:15
M
Joe Madiath image Joe Madiath
Social entrepreneur

Joe Madiath brings Indian villagers together around water and sanitation projects.

When he was 12, Joe Madiath unionized young workers to fight for better work conditions. They were employed by... his own father. He was therefore sent away to a boarding school. After his studies, travels across India, and participating in relief work afer a devastating cyclone, in 1979 he founded Gram Vikas. The name translates to "village development" in both Hindi and Oriya, the language of the state of Orissa, where the organization is primarily active.

The bulk of Gram Vikas' efforts are on water and sanitation. The organization's approach is based on partnership with villagers and gender equity. In order to benefit from Gram Vikas' support to install water and sanitation systems, the entire village community needs to commit to participate in the planning, construction and maintenance, and all villagers, regardless of social, economic or caste status, will have access to the same facilities. This requirement of 100 percent participation is difficult, Madiath acknowledges, but it leads to socially equitable and long-term solutions. Gram Vikas has already reached over 1,200 communities and over 400,000 people.

Session 9: Basic Needs
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
2:45 – 4:25
Pia Mancini image Pia Mancini
Democracy activist

Using software to inspire public debate and enable voter engagement, Pia Mancini hopes to upgrade modern democracy in Argentina and beyond.

After a disappointing brush with traditional political parties in Argentina, Pia Mancini realized that the existing democracy was disconnected from its citizens -- and that no one was likely to fix it.
 
In response, Mancini helped launch Democracy OS, an open-source mobile platform designed to provide Argentine citizens with immediate input into the legislative process. To promote it, she helped found the Partido de la Red, a new party running candidates committed to legislate only as directed by constituents using online tools for participation.
Session 2: Digital Reboot
Tues Oct 7, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
Patrícia Medici image Patrícia Medici
Wildlife conservationist

Patrícia Medici leads the longest running conservation project to protect the threatened lowland tapir.

Patrícia Medici is a Brazilian conservation biologist whose main professional interests are tapir conservation, tropical forest conservation, metapopulation management, landscape ecology and community-based conservation.

For the past 20 years, Patrícia has been working for a Brazilian non-governmental organization called IPÊ, Instituto de Pesquisas Ecológicas (Institute for Ecological Research), of which she was one of the founding members together with Cláudio and Suzana Padua. Since 1996, Patrícia has coordinated the Lowland Tapir Conservation Initiative in Brazil. Since 2000, Patrícia has been the Chairperson of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG), a network of over 120 tapir conservationists from 27 different countries worldwide.

Patrícia has a Bachelor’s Degree in Forestry Sciences from the São Paulo University (USP – Universidade de São Paulo), a Masters Degree in Wildlife Ecology, Conservation and Management from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG – Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais), Brazil, and a Ph.D. Degree in Biodiversity Management from the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE), University of Kent, United Kingdom. 

Patrícia has been honored with three very prestigious conservation awards: Harry Messel Conservation Leadership Award from the International Union for Conservation of Nature in 2004, Golden Ark Award from the Golden Ark Foundation in the Netherlands in 2008, and Whitley Award from the Whitley Fund for Nature in the United Kingdom also in 2008. Patrícia received the 2011 Research Prize from the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) of the University of Kent in the United Kingdom.

TED Fellows Talks: Session 1
Mon Oct 6, 2014
12:00 – 1:30
Juana Molina image Juana Molina
Musician

Singer and songwriter Juana Molina dreams up whispery, layered pop songs full of loops and swirls and unanswered questions.

Juana Molina's latest record, Wed 21, hit so many best-of lists it was almost inescapable at year-end in 2013 -- a clear indication that her hypnotic sound hit home with listeners around the world. In her own country of Argentina, it's said, she is still fighting perceptions based on her past life doing sketch comedy on TV -- but her relentlessly, richly layered work demands to be heard on its own terms.
 
As her music has progressed over half a dozen albums, she's gained confidence as a producer and a music-maker, pushing vocals more and more to the background to highlight the textures she creates with loops and guitars.
Session 10: Lateral Action
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Vincent Moon image Vincent Moon
Filmmaker

Global wanderer Vincent Moon explores and documents vanishing traditions with his evocative ethnomusical films.

Vincent Moon rose to acclaim through the Take Away Show, a blog showcasing his videos of indie rock musicians ranging from The National to REM, shot in intimate (and often unusual) locations with camera phones and other everyday technologies.
 
In 2008, Moon embarked on a worldwide journey with only the possessions and video tools he could carry on his back, eschewing profit and a traditional career for a nomadic lifestyle. He has wandered from Central Europe through Africa and into Northern Brazil, documenting and filming traditional music and sacred traditions for his Creative Commons web publishing initiative, Collection Petites Planètes. The New York Times wrote that "Moon proved it’s possible to reinvent an old, tired format (the music video) using the very thing (the Internet) that supposedly killed it.”
Session 8: Lenses
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
11:30 – 1:10
Kimberley Motley image Kimberley Motley
International litigator

American lawyer Kimberley Motley is the only Western litigator in Afghanistan's courts; as her practice expands to other countries, she thinks deeply about how to build the capacity of rule of law globally.

Kimberley Motley possesses a rare kind of grit—the kind necessary to hang a shingle in Kabul, represent the under-represented, weather a kaleidoscope of threats, and win the respect of the Afghan legal establishment (and of tribal leaders). At present she practices in the U.S., Afghanistan, Dubai, and the International Criminal Courts; as her practice expands to other countries, she thinks deeply about how to engage the legal community to build the capacity of rule of law globally.

After spending five years as a public defender in her native Milwaukee, Motley headed to Afghanistan to join a legal education program run by the U.S. State Department. She noticed Westerners stranded in Afghan prisons without representation, and started defending them. Today, she’s the only Western litigator in Kabul, and one of the most effective defense attorneys in Afghanistan. Her practice, which reports a 90 percent success rate, often represents non-Afghan defendants as well as pro-bono human rights cases.

Session 11: Fighters
Fri Oct 10, 2014
9:00 – 10:35
Sipho Moyo image Sipho Moyo
Africa advocate

Sipho Moyo aims to catalyze agricultural growth in Africa by calling on governments to create better policies and asking investors to fund better infrastructure.

Sipho Moyo, ONE's Africa Executive Director, wants the continent to overcome the shortcomings of the past. She sees a primary way to do this in implementing effective agricultural policies, and scaling up private investment in agriculture. "Africa has the potential to feed not only itself, but the world," she says. Earlier this year she launched the "Do Agric, It Pays" campaign, calling on African governments to comit to spending at least 10 percent of national budgets on effective agricultural investments.

A true global citizen, Moyo was born in Zimbabwe, was raised in exile, has lived in 10 countries on three continents and speaks multiple languages. She joined ONE in 2010 and has developed an authentically African advocacy agenda backed by over two million African members. Prior to join the organization founded by Bono, she worked for almost 20 years with the African Development Bank, the UN and the World Bank.
Session 9: Basic Needs
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
2:45 – 4:25
Robert Muggah image Robert Muggah
Megacities expert

Robert Muggah creates tools to understand cycles of violence in urban environments and opens dialogues on ways to confront them globally.

Robert Muggah drills down through shadowy data on arms trafficking, urban violence and resilience in search of answers for a rapidly urbanizing society’s most troubling questions: Why are cities so violent, and increasingly fragile? Why are conflicts within nations replacing conflicts between them? And what strategies can we implement to reduce violence?

Muggah's high-tech toolkit includes new ways for citizens to collect, collate and understand data, such as the mapping arms data (MAD) tool. As the research director of the Igarapé Institute and the SecDev Foundation, he developed the tool in collaboration with the Peace Research Institute Oslo and with Google Ideas, winning accolades for the transparency it brings to the debate.
Session 5: Urban Canvas
Wed Oct 8, 2014
11:30 – 1:20
Mundano image Mundano
Graffiti artist + activist

Mundano's bold, colorful street art isn't just eye candy. His projects call attention to social, environmental and political issues, while raising chuckles from passersby.

Mundano is a Brazilian street artist and activist whose work makes people stop and think about the issues swirling around them everyday. In 2007, he began using his graffiti skills to paint "carroças," the wooden and metal carts used by the trash collectors throughout Brazil who haul off junk and recyclables. He painted 200 carroças and in the process made these invisible superheroes visible—not only in the streets, but also in the media. The effort led to "Pimp My Carroça," which made this initiative do-it-yourself, crowdfunded and global. It has brought in 170 trash collectors in cities around the world, teaming them up with 200 street artists and 800 volunteers. It is quickly becoming a movement.

At home in Brazil, Mundano works on other projects too. Since 2008, he has used the posters and banners that plaster Brazilian cities during elections to create thought-provoking art. For the election in 2014, he turned these enormous plastic banners into a giant voting booth filled with waste in a square in Rio de Janeiro. "I use these ads to get people to reflect on the corrupted political system. On all the false promises, and all the awful waste," he explains.

TED Fellows Talks: Session 1
Mon Oct 6, 2014
12:00 – 1:30
Vik Muniz image Vik Muniz
Artist

Vik Muniz delights in subverting a viewer's expectations. He uses unexpected materials to create portraits, landscapes and still lifes, which he then photographs.

Slf-effacing, frankly open and thought-provoking, all at the same time, Vik Muniz explores the power of representation. He's known for his masterful use of unexpected materials such as chocolate syrup, toy soldiers and paper confetti, but his resulting images transcend mere gimmickry. Most recently, he's been working with a team at MIT to inscribe a castle on a grain of sand ... 

Muniz is often hailed as a master illusionist, but he says he's not interested in fooling people. Rather, he wants his images to show people a measure of their own belief. Muniz has exhibited his playfully provocative work in galleries all over the world and was featured in the documentary Waste Land, which follows Muniz around the largest garbage dump in Rio de Janeiro, as he photographs the collectors of recycled materials in which he finds inspiration and beauty. Describing the history of photography as "the history of blindness," his images simply but powerfully remind a viewer of what it means to see, and how our preconceptions can color every experience.

Session 10: Lateral Action
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
N
Na Batalha do Passinho image Na Batalha do Passinho
Funk dancers

The dance “O passinho do menor da favela” is a style of choreography that emerged from popular funk balls in Rio.

"O passinho" means "little step", and over the last decade this dance that melds hip hop, breakdancing, samba and is set to funk music became a trend in Rio de Janeiro's poor communities. Young people began to post videos on Youtube, researching the moves associated with other type of music and rhythms to enhance their own dancing at the balls and trying to out-compete each other. In 2011 "Batalha do Passinho" ("Battle of the little steps"), a competition, was born to make this amazing dance scene more visible. It attracted a lot of media attention and created links between dancers from the favelas and middle-class intellectuals and artists. The dancers became the main attraction of the flag handover ceremony between Britain and Brazil at the London 2012 Paralympics.

Last year, a second competition took place in 16 favelas of Rio, with a final showdown that gathered an audience of 50'000 at Madureira Park. In 2014 the dancers produced the spectacle "Na Batalha," which ran for several weeks, and took part in the Summer Season at Lincoln Center in New York.
Session 5: Urban Canvas
Wed Oct 8, 2014
11:30 – 1:20
Ethan Nadelmann image Ethan Nadelmann
Drug policy reformer

Ethan Nadelmann has ushered the once-marginal issue of drug legalization onto the center stage of US political debate.

Once derided as the province of spaced-out collegiate activists, the fight to reform marijuana and other drug laws is becoming increasingly mainstream in the US -- thanks in large part to the Drug Policy Alliance and its founder, Ethan Nadelmann.

Nadelmann believes that America (and the world) is losing the war on drugs, with disastrous implications for marginalized communities, exploding prison populations, and law enforcement in general. His arguments have converted politicians and policy-makers on both sides of the aisle. And the debate is shifting, with US states such as Colorado legalizing marjuana for recreational use, and countries such as Uruguay taking similar steps.
Session 3: Crossing Borders
Tues Oct 7, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Jimmy Nelson image Jimmy Nelson
Last tribes photographer

Jimmy Nelson’s photographs of vanishing tribes illuminate the indigenous cultures of our shared world.

In his quest to photograph endangered cultures, Jimmy Nelson has endured Kalishnikov-toting Banna tribesmen, subzero reindeer attacks, and thousands of miles of hard travel. With a blend of humility and humor, Nelson won the trust of each of his subjects, using an antique plate camera to create stunning portraits of 35 indigenous tribes.

The result is Before They Pass Away, a photo treasury that Nelson hopes will not only help preserve the lifestyles of people the world over, but also perhaps inspire readers in the developed world to ponder their own connections with their ancestral environments.
Session 8: Lenses
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
11:30 – 1:10
Miguel Nicolelis image Miguel Nicolelis
Neuroscientist

Miguel Nicolelis explores the limits of the brain-machine interface.

At the Nicolelis Laboratory at Duke University, Miguel Nicolelis is best known for pioneering studies in neuronal population coding, Brain Machine Interfaces (BMI) and neuroprosthetics in human patients and non-human primates.His lab's work was seen, famously though a bit too briefly, when a brain-controlled exoskeleton from his lab helped Juliano Pinto, a paraplegic man, kick the first ball at the 2014 World Cup.

But his lab is thinking even bigger. They've developed an integrative approach to studying neurological disorders, including Parkinsons disease and epilepsy. The approach, they hope, will allow the integration of molecular, cellular, systems and behavioral data in the same animal, producing a more complete understanding of the nature of the neurophysiological alterations associated with these disorders. He's the author of the books Beyond Boundaries and The Relativistic Brain.

Miguel was honored as one of Foreign Policy's 2015 Global Thinkers.

Session 6: Empowering Tech
Wed Oct 8, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
O
Aakash Odedra image Aakash Odedra
Choreographer

Aakash Odedra sets raw ancient dance forms from India within the modern global context.

Based in the UK with a growing international reputation, Aakash Odedra tells stories through movement. His art is about the expression of the classical Indian dance forms Kathak and Bharat Nagyam, full of mythology, and their juxtaposition with the modern age.

He formed Aakash Odedra Company in 2011 to develop his own choreographic work. His debut project, Rising (2011), has won numerous international awards. Through 2013/2014 he worked with Australian choreographer Lewis Major and Austrian based Ars Electronica Futurelab in an exploration of warped and exaggerated realities. They created Murmur, which uses ancient dance and media technology to tell of Aakash's own struggles with dyslexia.
Session 12: Mighty Spaces
Fri Oct 10, 2014
11:30 – 1:00
Gustavo Ollitta image Gustavo Ollitta
Buugeng juggler

A young circus performer and juggler, Gustavo Ollitta manipulates the buugeng (an S-shaped staff) to create a surreal, ethereal performance.

While watching Gustavo Ollitta spin a pair of buugeng, it’s understandable if you freeze the video once or twice to check for editing tricks. And you may have this impulse while watching live too.
 
The buugeng, a black-and-white-striped staff shaped like a wide, flat S, is shaped and painted to fool the eye in a most delightfully baffling way -- to create an illusion its inventor calls “kaleidoscopic flow.” And in the smooth hands of a young master like Olitta, born in São Paulo and working now in Turin, Italy, the buugeng is downright psychedelic.
Session 2: Digital Reboot
Tues Oct 7, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
Alessandra Orofino image Alessandra Orofino
Political mobilization activist

Alessandra Orofino founded Meu Rio, Rio de Janeiro’s largest mobilization network.

After working as a field researcher in Brazil and India, interviewing young girls who had been victims of domestic violence, Alessandra Orofino founded Meu Rio in 2011. The organization has fueled bottom-up local politics using a combination of on-the-ground actions and custom-designed online and mobile platforms and apps.

Orofino, who's 25 years old with a degree in economics and human rights from Columbia, is a believer in participatory politics and in cities as the ideal locus for reinventing representative democracy, and with her team she has designed Meu Rio as a catalyst for youth activism. Among its 140,000 members are tens of thousands of millennials, identifying common issues, pooling ideas for solutions, and pressuring decision-makers to adopt new policies and practices.

Session 2: Digital Reboot
Tues Oct 7, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
P
José Padilha image José Padilha
Filmmaker

José Padilha delves into interlocking layers of street crime and institutional power with his unflinching action and documentary films.

Starting with the documentary Bus 174, director Jose Padilha’s harrowing and often violent films have exposed the political roots of brutality in South America and beyond.

With his action film Elite Squad, Padilha unearthed the culture of violence rampant in Rio’s favelas -- and ignited a debate on crime and corrupt police tactics in Brazil. “Not since City of God has a Brazilian film excited such debate as Elite Squad", wrote The Guardian. His 2014 reboot of RoboCop questioned the growing abuse of mechanized weapons worldwide.

Padilha’s latest project explores the lawless frontiers of South America’s tri-border region, where terrorism, drug trafficking, and covert military actions intersect.
Session 3: Crossing Borders
Tues Oct 7, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Bel Pesce image Bel Pesce
Entrepreneur

Bel Pesce left Brazil to study at MIT. But after a successful stint in Silicon Valley, she returned to inspire others with great ideas in her country to make them a reality.

Bel Pesce has worked at big technology companies — in at internship at Microsoft, she led the team for Microsoft Touchless and, as an intern at Google, she worked to improve the Google Translate system. She has also worked in finance, at Deutsche Bank, and helped launch several startups — most notably, the video platform Ooyala and Lemon Wallet, an app that replicates the contents of your wallet on your phone.  But for her latest venture, Pesce is looking to inspire. She has opened a school, FazINOVA, which is dedicated to helping students — both in live courses in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and online — persevere toward their dreams. The school has grown tremendously since its establishment in 2013.

Pesce, a TED Fellow, is also the author of three books: The Brazilian Girl from Silicon Valley, Superheroes: WANTED and The Girl from Silicon Valley 2. She has been named one of the "100 most influential people of Brazil" by Época Magazine.

 

TED University
Tues Oct 7, 2014
9:00 – 10:30
Elizabeth Pisani image Elizabeth Pisani
Author

In Elizabeth Pisani's latest book, she explores the "improbable nation" of Indonesia.

In fast-emerging Asia there is one nation that, despite being the world's fourth most-populous (and the third most-populous democracy) and the largest Muslim country (with 210 million people who identify themselves as such), is also, as Elizabeth Pisani writes, "probably the most invisible country in the world". Indonesia. An archipelago of over 17,000 islands that span a distance like that from New York to Alaska, with over 700 languages and a dynamic economy -- but which, puzzingly, doesn't really feature in the global imagination.

Pisani spent two years travelling 23,000 kilometers by boat, bus and motorbike through Indonesia, a place that has fascinated and maddened her since she first lived there over two decades ago. Her portrait of the country, the recent Indonesia Etc.: Exploring the Improbable Nation, reveals the archipelago's complexity and contradictions, a fascinating diversity that "is not just geographic and cultural: different groups are essentially living at different points in human history, all at the same time."

An alumna of various government health agencies, Pisani became an assumption-busting independent researcher and analyst, polling transgendered sex workers, drug addicts and others to illuminate the surprising (and often ignored) demographics that belie traditional studies.

Pisani is fearlessly outspoken on the global failure to understand and manage the realities of AIDS, decrying the tangled roles that money, votes, and media play in the public health landscape. She shows how politics and "morality" have hogtied funding, and advocates for putting dollars where they can actually make a difference. As the Globe and Mail wrote: “Pisani is lucid, colourful, insightful and impatient.”

Session 8: Lenses
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
11:30 – 1:10
Mark Plotkin image Mark Plotkin
Amazonian ethnobotanist

As fast as the rainforest is disappearing -- the people of the rainforest are disappearing even faster. Mark Plotkin works to preserve generations of knowledge.

Mark Plotkin is an ethnobotanist, studying the traditional uses for plants in Central and South America forests. He works closely with shamans, community leaders who practice traditional healing techniques using plants and animals, learned over uncounted generations. But when forests are disrupted (by illegal logging, for instance), that knowledge risks being lost. Plotkin's work helps to collect and share shamanic learning, with a twofold goal: to preserve the rainforest by showing its value as a source of yet-to-be-discovered pharmaceuticals.
 
Plotkin pioneered his research working with the Trio Indians of southern Suriname, and has also worked with elder shamans from Mexico, Panama, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Colombia and Brazil. He's the author of the best-selling book Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice. With his wife, Liliana Madrigal, he co-founded the Amazon Conservation Team, a group that helps indigenous people purchase and protect their sacred sites.

 

Session 12: Mighty Spaces
Fri Oct 10, 2014
11:30 – 1:00
R
Navi Radjou image Navi Radjou
Innovation strategist

Drawing inspiration from frugal innovators in emerging markets, Navi Radjou helps businesses with limited resources discover unexpected ways to succeed.

In the best-selling book Jugaad Innovation, Navi Radjou and his co-authors borrow the Hindi word for improvised solutions to illustrate how organizations can hurdle stubborn challenges with quick thinking, innovative planning and entrepreneurial agility to deliver greater value to clients and consumers worldwide.

Radjou believes that “frugal innovation,” inspired by companies in emerging markets such as India and China, is gradually being adopted in Western economies, and that it "promises to become a unifying element in North-South cooperation in an increasingly interconnected globally economy".

A fellow at Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge, Radjou is a member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Design Innovation and a columnist at the Harvard Business Review.
Session 9: Basic Needs
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
2:45 – 4:25
Dilip Ratha image Dilip Ratha
Remittances expert

Economist Dilip Ratha was the first to analyze the global significance of remittances -- money sent from foreign workers to their families back home.

At over US$400 billion per year, and growing, remittances -- money sent home by migrants -- are three times bigger than the total of international aid budgets, and represent some of the largest financial inflows to poor countries. Economist Dilip Ratha was the first to point out the global and national significance of remittances and their social and economic impact.

He is the manager of the Migration and Remittances team at the World Bank and the head of the Global knowledge partnership on migration and development (KNOMAD). He also co-coordinates the G8/G20 Global Remittances Working Group, and is involved in a number of other organizations focusing on remittances. Besides migration, he has done pioneering work on innovative financing including diaspora bonds and South-South foreign direct investment.

Session 3: Crossing Borders
Tues Oct 7, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Usman Riaz image Usman Riaz
Percussive guitarist

Young guitarist Usman Riaz pulls a rich, swirling sound out of the acoustic guitar.

TEDGlobal Fellow Usman Riaz is a young Pakistani musician making a worldwide mark with his astonishing and fun-to-listen-to technique. Influenced by percussive guitarists--who move beyond strumming to striking, treating their fretboard like the soundboard of a piano--Riaz makes a sound that feels larger than the instrument itself, with a compelling pattern of repetition and variation that harkens to mystical music traditions.

In 2011, a viral video for his song "Fire Fly" helped bring his sound from the small-but-thriving Pakistani music community to a global audience. He's now collaborating with other musicians in Pakistan and working on a new album of original music.

Session 11: Fighters
Fri Oct 10, 2014
9:00 – 10:35
Usman Riaz image Usman Riaz
Percussive guitarist

Young guitarist Usman Riaz pulls a rich, swirling sound out of the acoustic guitar.

TEDGlobal Fellow Usman Riaz is a young Pakistani musician making a worldwide mark with his astonishing and fun-to-listen-to technique. Influenced by percussive guitarists--who move beyond strumming to striking, treating their fretboard like the soundboard of a piano--Riaz makes a sound that feels larger than the instrument itself, with a compelling pattern of repetition and variation that harkens to mystical music traditions.

In 2011, a viral video for his song "Fire Fly" helped bring his sound from the small-but-thriving Pakistani music community to a global audience. He's now collaborating with other musicians in Pakistan and working on a new album of original music.

Session 11: Fighters
Fri Oct 10, 2014
9:00 – 10:35
Usman Riaz image Usman Riaz
Percussive guitarist

Young guitarist Usman Riaz pulls a rich, swirling sound out of the acoustic guitar.

TEDGlobal Fellow Usman Riaz is a young Pakistani musician making a worldwide mark with his astonishing and fun-to-listen-to technique. Influenced by percussive guitarists--who move beyond strumming to striking, treating their fretboard like the soundboard of a piano--Riaz makes a sound that feels larger than the instrument itself, with a compelling pattern of repetition and variation that harkens to mystical music traditions.

In 2011, a viral video for his song "Fire Fly" helped bring his sound from the small-but-thriving Pakistani music community to a global audience. He's now collaborating with other musicians in Pakistan and working on a new album of original music.

Session 11: Fighters
Fri Oct 10, 2014
9:00 – 10:35
Matthieu Ricard image Matthieu Ricard
Monk, author, photographer

Sometimes called the "happiest man in the world," Matthieu Ricard is a Buddhist monk, author and photographer.

After training in biochemistry at the Institute Pasteur, Matthieu Ricard left science behind to move to the Himalayas and become a Buddhist monk -- and to pursue happiness, both at a basic human level and as a subject of inquiry. Achieving happiness, he has come to believe, requires the same kind of effort and mind training that any other serious pursuit involves.

His deep and scientifically tinged reflections on happiness and Buddhism have turned into several books, including The Quantum and the Lotus: A Journey to the Frontiers Where Science and Buddhism Meet. At the same time, he also makes sensitive and jaw-droppingly gorgeous photographs of his beloved Tibet and the spiritual hermitage where he lives and works on humanitarian projects.

His latest book on happiness is Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill; his latest book of photographs is Tibet: An Inner Journey.

Session 12: Mighty Spaces
Fri Oct 10, 2014
11:30 – 1:00
Andrés Ruzo image Andrés Ruzo
Geoscientist

Andrés Ruzo investigates the Earth's heat and the mystery of a boiling river in the Peruvian rainforest.

Andrés Ruzo is a tri-citizen who grew up among Nicaragua, Peru and Texas -- which helped him see that most of the world's problems are not confined by geographic or cultural borders. While trying to imagine solutions, he realized the way we produce and use energy lies at the root of many of our biggest issues. Combined with his memories of summers on his family's farm on Nicaragua's Casita volcano, playing in the fumarole fields, this prompted him to pursue a PhD in geophysics at SMU, focusing on geothermal studies. He is also a National Geographic Young Explorer.

Investigating a childhood legend led him to the Shanay-timpishka, the "Boiling River" of the Amazon, and a sacred site to the indigenous tribes, where the water can reach over 95 °C (203 °F). The greatest mystery of this place: How can a "boiling river" exist 700 km (435 miles) from the nearest volcanic center?
Session 1: Stories
Tues Oct 7, 2014
11:30 – 1:00
S
Taiye Selasi image Taiye Selasi
Author

In her writings, Taiye Selasi explores our relationship to our multiple identities.

A writer and photographer of Nigerian and Ghanaian descent, born in London and raised in Boston, now living in Rome and Berlin, who has studied Latin and music, Taiye Selasi is herself a study in the modern meaning of identity. In 2005 she published the much-discussed (and controversial) essay "Bye-Bye, Babar (Or: What Is an Afropolitan?)," offering an alternative vision of African identity for a transnational generation. Prompted by writer Toni Morrison, the following year she published the short story "The Sex Lives of African Girls" in the literary magazine Granta.

Her first novel Ghana Must Go, published in 2013, is a tale of family drama and reconciliation, following six characters and spanning generations, continents, genders and classes.

Session 3: Crossing Borders
Tues Oct 7, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Bill Bill "Blinky Bill" Sellanga
Musician

Kenyan musician, producer and DJ Blinky Bill Sellanga makes experimental, genre-bending music for popular radio while addressing political themes and giving voice to Kenyan youth.

As a producer, a DJ and a musician, Blinky Bill Sellanga captures the boom and pop of modern Kenyan city life in impossibly infectious grooves. He came to fame as part of the Kenyan musical collective Just A Band, whose debut album, Scratch to Reveal, was released in 2008, and who found critical success and popularity exploring various musical directions such as, but not limited to, jazz, hip-hop, disco and electronica. The video for their single “Ha-He,” featuring a character known as Makmende, has been called “Kenya’s first viral internet sensation.” Just A Band took a break in 2016, and Sellanga is forging ahead as a solo artist, making new connections wherever he goes. Sellanga is a TED Fellow.

TED Fellows Talks: Session 2
Mon Oct 6, 2014
2:45 – 4:15
Ricardo Semler image Ricardo Semler
Organizational changemaker

Two decades after transforming a struggling equipment supplier into a radically democratic and resilient (and successful) company, Ricardo Semler wants organizations to become wise.

After assuming control of Semler & Company (Semco) from his father in 1980, Brazil's Ricardo Semler began a decades-long quest to create an organization that could function without him, by studying and then implementing what could best be called "corporate democracy", allowing employees to design their own jobs, select their supervisors, and define pay levels. He has then applied the same principles to education, banking and hospitality. All with very good results.

He's now promoting the idea of designing organizations -- companies, schools, NGOs -- for wisdom. With a question as a starting point: If we were to start from scratch, would we design organization X the way we have done it?
Session 10: Lateral Action
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
Alanna Shaikh image Alanna Shaikh
Global health and development specialist

Global development expert Alanna Shaikh takes on the toughest of health issues—from the ones affecting the globe at large to the ones hurting her own family.

TED Fellow Alanna Shaikh is a global health and development specilist with a vendetta against jargon. On her blog, Blood and Milk, she aims to make global development issues both accessible and understandable. In her TED Book, What's Killing Us, she explains the biggest challenges in global wellness -- from HIV/AIDS to the diminishing effectiveness of antibiotics -- in a way that anyone can understand. Earlier this year, she co-founded AidSource, a social network for aid workers. She is also the co-founder of the group SMART Aid, which educates donors and start-up projects about international aid. 

Alanna Shaikh is especially interested in Alzheimer's, as she has watched her father deteriorate from the disease over the past 12 years. But she says the experience has not sent her into denial—she plans to be prepared for the genetically transmitted disease, should it ever arrive. 

TED Fellows Talks: Session 2
Mon Oct 6, 2014
2:45 – 4:15
Jose Miguel Sokoloff image Jose Miguel Sokoloff
Anti-guerrilla creative

Ad exec Jose Miguel Sokoloff has led a multi-year marketing campaign that's helped Colombian guerrillas realize that they are wanted back home.

Jose Miguel Sokoloff knows what it's like to go into a jungle to make a commercial in a Black Hawk helicopter surrounded by soldiers with machine guns. In the last few years he has planned and realized pro-bono ad campaigns on behalf of the Ministry of Defense against the guerrilla war in Colombia -- to persuade FARC guerrillas to demoblize.
 
Realizing that a guerrillero is as much a prisoner of his organization as are his hostages, Sokoloff and his team played on the promise of freedom. At Christmas 2010, his agency, Lowe-SSP3 Colombia, placed nine decorated holiday trees in the jungle near a banner ad that read: "If Christmas can come to the jungle, you can come home. Demobilize." It won gold at Cannes Lions -- but the most important prize was that it succeeded in its intent, creating a spike in demobilization rates.
 
The following year the agency planned a poetic campaign called "Rivers of Light" (Operación Ríos de Luz), which floated a raft of glowing plastic balls, filled with gifts and messages from family, down rivers that the revolutionaries typically travel. Christmas 2012's campaign, "Operation Bethlehem," lit up wayfinding "stars" over local villages, offering defectors a route back.
 
Meanwhile, Sokoloff's agency also handles large global consumer clients like Unilever, as well as the Colombian newspaper El Espectador.
Session 1: Stories
Tues Oct 7, 2014
11:30 – 1:00
Steve Song image Steve Song
Telecommunications activist

Steve Song founded Village Telco to develop a network infrastructure that can bring affordable voice and internet service to communities throughout Africa and around the world.

Kickstarting entrepreneurship in Africa is impossible without internet connectivity. That’s why social entrepreneur and telecom expert Steve Song founded Village Telco. His company helps remote and underserviced communities access very-low-cost voice and internet services.
 
Now, he wants to use “television white spaces”—the spectrum between the TV channels—to deliver broadband connectivity across the continent and catalyze entrepreneurship and innovation.
Session 6: Empowering Tech
Wed Oct 8, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
Jorge Soto image Jorge Soto
Cancer technologist

Jorge Soto is helping develop a simple, noninvasive test that identifies cancer.

Last year, electrical engineer Jorge Soto co-founded mirOculus with a group of fellow Singularity University students to push forward the development of a bold new test for cancer -- one that functions by looking for microRNA in the bloodstream, which could point to the presence of different types of cancer at very early stages. It's early stages for the device as well, but initial trials are promising. The open source device debuted publicly at the TEDGlobal conference in 2014.
 
Soto is a graduate of both Tec de Monterrey and Singularity University. In September 2013, he returned to Mexico to help the President’s Office develop strategies and projects that encourage civic participation, transparency, accountability and innovation in Mexico, and improve the communication between citizens and their institutions.
Session 8: Lenses
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
11:30 – 1:10
Omoyele Sowore image Omoyele Sowore
Publisher and activist

Omoyele Sowore runs Sahara Reporters, a grass-roots Nigerian news organization at the frontlines of the citizen journalist movement.

As a student struggling against the Nigerian military junta of the ’80s and ’90s, Omoyele Sowore marvelled at the power of the journalists who spoke out against corruption -- only to become frustrated as the mainstream Nigerian media succumbed to intimidation.

After surviving abduction and torture and moving to the US, Sowore realized that Nigeria’s emerging online culture opened the door for web journalism in Africa. As a partner in Elendu Reports, Sowore began exposing the financial abuses of corrupt politicians. In 2006, he founded Sahara Reporters, a popular online news platform with a reputation for scathing and accurate reporting.

Session 11: Fighters
Fri Oct 10, 2014
9:00 – 10:35
Danay Suárez image Danay Suárez
Singer-songwriter

With roots in the Havana underground music scene, Danay Suárez’s soulful, lyrical hip-hop style is a powerful addition to Cuban and world music culture.

Danay Suárez's music has hit big worldwide since London producer Gilles Peterson featured her on his first Havana Cultura compilation of artists from Cuba. But her soul -- and her smooth hip-hop lyrics -- reflect the complex beauty of Havana.

This came to the fore after Jay-Z and Beyoncé spent their fifth anniversary in Havana in 2013; some US fans got upset about that, so Jay-Z wrote the scathing track “Open Letter,” picking apart Cuban-American relations. And who was the first Cuban artist to respond? It was Suárez -- who looked past the immediate fracas to tell the story of the Cuban people through her eyes. As Afropop.org translates her lyrics: “We are the polemical species on the planet / We are victims of an incomplete freedom.”

Session 1: Stories
Tues Oct 7, 2014
11:30 – 1:00
Robert Swan image Robert Swan
Polar explorer

Robert Swan has explored both poles, and wants to make sure that Antarctica, the world's last great wilderness, is never exploited.

When Robert Swan, OBE, set foot on the North Pole in 1989, he entered the history books as the first person to walk to both poles. But the South Pole, which he had reached in 1984, inspired his life's work -- to preserve Antarctica in the face of climate change.

Swan's organization 2041 (named for the date when the world’s moratoriums on mining and drilling in Antarctica will expire) leads expeditions of the world's most influential people to the continent in hopes that it will ignite their passion for preservation. The hope: to affect real and lasting environmental policy changes.

 

Session 12: Mighty Spaces
Fri Oct 10, 2014
11:30 – 1:00
Fred Swaniker image Fred Swaniker
Educational entrepreneur

Ghanaian Fred Swaniker founded a school and a leadership network to educate and support the next generation of Africa’s leaders.

2009 TED Fellow Fred Swaniker believes that what's been holding Africa back has been the lack of good leadership. He founded the African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg to attract the best and brightest students from across the continent and give them a foundation in ethical, entrepreneurial leadership. Next, he formed the African Leadership Network to catalyze prosperity by strengthening the relationships between graduates as they step into positions of leadership and vision.
Session 11: Fighters
Fri Oct 10, 2014
9:00 – 10:35
Ilona Szabó de Carvalho image Ilona Szabó de Carvalho
Policy reformer

Ilona Szabó de Carvalho leads the Igarapé Institute in Rio de Janeiro, which focuses on security and development policy.

Ilona Szabó de Carvalho is a drug policy and public security specialist with experience from Brazil and around the world. A founder of the Igarapé Institute, a think-and-do tank, she also coordinates the international Global Commission on Drug Policy.

Over the past decade, Ilona has played a central role in triggering debate on progressive approaches to preventing violence, advocating gun control and police reform, and dealing with drugs, pushing for a radical re-examination of key policies. In particular, recognizing that drug prohibition has done little to slake demand for drugs or to reduce profit margins for the cartels (and the armed violence to which they are inexorably linked), de Carvalho believes we should shift the control of drugs from organized crime to governments -- and view abuse as a health problem, not as a criminal offense.
Session 7: Blueprints
Wed Oct 8, 2014
5:15 – 7:00
T
Bassam Tariq image Bassam Tariq
Creative spirit

Bassam Tariq delights in making eclectic career choices. A blogger, a filmmaker, and a butcher's shop owner, the common theme linking everything together is his boundless celebration of humanity.

"Our purpose is simple: we are here to change the world’s relationship to their food." TED Fellow Bassam Tariq does not have small dreams; every project he undertakes is a big plan to make real change. Hence the butcher's shop he helped to open in Manhattan's East Village is organic, halal, and specifically designed to encourage healthier eating habits and happier families.

In 2011, Bassam and his friend Aman Ali resolved to spend each night of Ramadan in a different mosque in 30 states around the United States -- and write about the experience. The result, 30 Mosques in 30 States, was a celebration of the stunning diversity of the Muslim experience in America, and a celebration of individual stories worth telling. Similarly, his documentary, These Birds Walk, is a portrayal of real life for street kids in Karachi, Pakistan.

TED Fellows Talks: Session 1
Mon Oct 6, 2014
12:00 – 1:30
Anastasia Taylor-Lind image Anastasia Taylor-Lind
Documentary photographer

Anastasia Taylor-Lind is a documentary photographer who works around the world on issues relating to women, birth rights, depopulation and post-conflict regions.

Anastasia Taylor-Lind is an independent documentary photographer based in London. The TED Fellow has photographed hidden groups from hard to reach places, such as female PKK guerilla fighters, Gaza zookeepers and Siberian supermodels. Taylor-Lind's work has been shown in spaces like the Saatchi Gallery and London's National Portrait Gallery. Her first book, Maidan -- Portraits from the Black Squarewas released in 2014.
TED Fellows Talks: Session 2
Mon Oct 6, 2014
2:45 – 4:15
Ana Tijoux image Ana Tijoux
Singer-songwriter

Ana Tijoux mixes a whirlwind of influence from her Chilean heritage as well as traditional Latin beats and hip-hop.

When Ana Tijoux takes the stage to perform her political, personal and intricate tracks, she brings with her a raft of global influence -- but it comes out as completely new. She first gained attention as a hip-hop MC with Makiza, a late-’90s Chilean band influenced by the conscious, positive rap style of De La Soul. With her 2006 hit “Eres par mi,” a duet with Mexican singer Julieta Venegas, she topped the pop charts in Latin America. And then her song “1977” appeared on the TV hit Breaking Bad ...
 
Her latest record is Vengo, released in March 2014, which MTV called “some of the most dazzling hip-hop this year.” She spills her powerful lyrics -- about nature, and about the nature of power -- over original instrumental tracks that feature South American instruments (and no samples). As she writes: “Vengo, en busca de respuestas con el manojo lleno y las venas abiertas/ Vengo, como un libro abierto, ansiosa de aprender la historia no contada de nuestros ancestros.” (“I come for answers, with a bundle of full and open veins/ I come as an open book eager to learn the untold story of our ancestors.”)

Session 6: Empowering Tech
Wed Oct 8, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
Bruno Torturra image Bruno Torturra
Livestreaming activist

Journalist and photographer Bruno Torturra is the face of Media Ninja, a Brazilian digital collective making headlines for its ability to cover big news as it happens.

After 11 years as a correspondent and chief editor for Trip Magazine (“Dedicated to the exploration of psychedelic and visionary drug subculture”), São Paolo writer and photographer Bruno Torturra founded two experimental livestreaming networks: first PosTV, then Media Ninja. The latter drew global attention for its collective coverage of the 2013 protests in Brazil, and the questions it raises about the role of traditional journalism and the power of livestreaming technology.
Session 6: Empowering Tech
Wed Oct 8, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
Dave Troy image Dave Troy
Technologist

The co-host of TEDxMidAtlantic, Dave Troy is a serial entrepreneur and a data-viz fan.

Dave Troy is a serial entrepreneur and community activist in Baltimore, Maryland. He is CEO and product architect at 410 Labs, maker of the popular e-mail management tool Mailstrom.co. He has been acknowledged by the founding team at Twitter as the first developer to utilize the Twitter API, with his project “Twittervision,” which was featured in the 2008 MoMA exhibition “Design and the Elastic Mind.” His crowdsourced project Peoplemaps.org uses social network data to map cities. He is also organizer of TEDxMidAtlantic and is passionate about data, cities, and entrepreneurship.

Read his post, "The Math Behind Peoplemaps."

TED University
Tues Oct 7, 2014
9:00 – 10:30
Zeynep Tufekci image Zeynep Tufekci
Techno-sociologist

Techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufekci asks big questions about our societies and our lives as they play out online.

We've never had so many ways to express ourselves to the world, to break news, blast opinions, build communities. Zeynep Tufekci studies how online voices and online crowds -- using Facebook, Twitter and other social tools -- interact with traditional power. Her analysis of the Gezi Park demonstrations in her native Turkey broke new ground, and she's quickly become a must-follow on Medium for her sharp insights into news and events that are, more and more, influenced by spontaneous online social reaction.

An assistant professor at the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, she's a faculty associate at Harvard's Berkman Center and the co-editor of Inequity in the Technopolis, a 10-year longitudinal study of tech access in Austin, Texas.

Session 2: Digital Reboot
Tues Oct 7, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
V
Naná Vasconcelos image Naná Vasconcelos
Music icon

A jazz icon since the late 1960s, Naná Vasconcelos contributed Latin percussion to some of the world’s most cerebral, soulful music.

Growing up absorbing a range of music, from classical Brazilian Villa-Lobos to Jimi Hendrix,  Naná Vasconcelos became an innovative percussionist who could pick up a beat on almost any instrument. He came to specialize in the berimbau, the single-stringed Brazillian percussion instrument, and in the polyrhythms typical of his home in northern Brazil.
 
Starting his career with a young Milton Nascimiento, he became a frequent collaborator with what came to be called (deeply over-simply, of course) jazz intellectuals -- bandleaders like Don Cherry and Pat Metheny and crossover artists like saxophonist and composer Jan Garbarek who play with silence, improv and a broad palette of sound. He released a slew of his own records as a bandleader, and throughout his life he sought fresh sounds with new collaborators. For a taste, try his 2009 collaboration with Joyce and Mauricio Maestro, Visions of Dawn: The Paris 1976 Project.
Session 8: Lenses
Thurs Oct 9, 2014
11:30 – 1:10
Angelo Vermeulen image Angelo Vermeulen
Space researcher, biologist, artist

Angelo Vermeulen wears many hats, including one as a crew commander for NASA, another as an artist and community organizer.

If you're looking for someone who embodies "multidisciplinary," look no further than TED Senior Fellow Angelo Vermeulen, a space systems researcher, biologist, artist and community organizer. The one common thread in all his work: the desire to understand the relationship between nature and technology, to learn from what's happened in the past in order to build a promising future for us all. 

Having received his PhD in Biology from the University of Leuven in Belgium, Angelo nonetheless eschewed a life in the lab to apply a creative lens to everything he does. To date, that includes working on independent projects around the world, including Biomodd, a worldwide series of interactive art installations in which technology and nature coexist. Throughout 2011, he was a member of the European Space Agency Topical Team Arts & Science (ETTAS), while in 2013 he was crew commander of the NASA-funded HI-SEAS Mars mission simulation in Hawaii. For this project, he and a crew of six astronauts lived for four months in a dome, all in the name of studying the effects of longterm isolation among a small crew.

In 2009 he launched SEAD (Space Ecologies Art and Design), a platform for research on the architectures and ethics of space colonization. In 2014, he launched Seeker, a project calling for the public to co-create starship sculptures that evolve over time; this subject is also the focus of a new PhD at Delft University of Technology, for which he's developing "paradigm-shifting concepts for evolvable starships."

In 2012 he was a Michael Kalil Endowment for Smart Design Fellow at Parsons in New York. He holds positions at LUCA School of Visual Arts in Ghent, Belgium, and Die Angewandte in Vienna, Austria.

TED University
Tues Oct 7, 2014
9:00 – 10:30
W
Joanna Wheeler image Joanna Wheeler
Social change advocate

Writer and researcher Joanna Wheeler combines participatory workshops and creative storytelling to help marginalized communities develop strong responses to exclusion.

Joanna Wheeler, a senior research associate with the Sustainable Livelihoods Foundation in South Africa, studies and develops the fundamental components of a grassroots movement, like agency, participation, and accountability. Through participatory workshops, technology, and innovative approaches to group facilitation, she helps excluded or persecuted communities from Brazil to Africa gather and use their power to effect lasting change.
Session 5: Urban Canvas
Wed Oct 8, 2014
11:30 – 1:20
Tom Wujec image Tom Wujec
Designer

Tom Wujec studies how we share and absorb information. He's an innovative practitioner of business visualization -- using design and technology to help groups solve problems and understand ideas. He is a Fellow at Autodesk.

Tom Wujec is a Fellow at Autodesk, the makers of design software for engineers, filmmakers, designers. At Autodesk, he has worked on software including SketchBook Pro, PortfolioWall and Maya (which won an Academy Award for its contribution to the film industry). As a Fellow, he helps companies work in the emerging field of business visualization, the art of using images, sketches and infographics to help teams solve complex problems as a group.

He's the author of several books, including Five-Star Mind: Games and Puzzles to Stimulate Your Creativity and Imagination.

TED University
Tues Oct 7, 2014
9:00 – 10:30
Y
Oren Yakobovich image Oren Yakobovich
Human-rights activist

Videre co-founder Oren Yakobovich wields the latest covert recording technology to expose and subvert violent oppression.

Using recording technology -- some of it so secret you haven’t heard of it yet -- Videre connects with activists deep within the most repressive regimes to video-document human-rights abuses and expose them to worldwide scrutiny. Yakobovich believes that only action by the oppressed communities themselves will temper the worst excesses of their authoritarian governments. 

Videre's name comes from the Latin expression "videre est credere" -- to see is to believe. Previously, Yakobovich (together with Israeli watchdog group B’Tselem) initiated the camera documentation project, which delivered hundreds of cameras to Palestinians to expose the daily realities of life in the West Bank. 

Session 4: Field Work
Wed Oct 8, 2014
9:00 – 10:40
Tashka Yawanawá image Tashka Yawanawá
Chief of the Yawanawá

Chief Tashka Yawanawá represents the critical perspective often missed in the discussions about the future of indigenous people in Brazil: that of the indigenous people themselves.

For Tashka Yawanawá, chief of the Yawanawá people living in the Acre region of Brazil, engagement with the world begins with his people’s right to self-determination and self-worth.
 
The son of a former leader of the Yawanawá, as a boy Tashka witnessed the near annihilation of his culture by the New Tribes Mission and by the pressure of economic interests. He studied in the United States and visited other indigenous communities and with other tribal leaders in the Amazon, he is working to restore dignity, identity, and a sustainable economic future to indigenous populations founded on their own values, culture, and definition of prosperity.
Session 1: Stories
Tues Oct 7, 2014
11:30 – 1:00
Andy Yen image Andy Yen
Secure email developer

Andy Yen is building an encrypted email program that lets everyone benefit from private communication.

Andy Yen is a scientist at CERN. With two colleagues, Wei Sun and Jason Stockman, he co-founded ProtonMail, an encrypted email startup based in Geneva, Switzerland, that seeks to make secure email accessible. The group aims to advance internet security and protect online privacy rights by making it possible for everyone to incorporate encryption into their everyday communication.

A physicist and economist by training, since 2010 Andy has been part of the ATLAS experiment at CERN, where his research focus has been on searches for supersymmetric particles. He is translating his experience in large-scale computing to build the infrastructure that is used to run ProtonMail.
Session 2: Digital Reboot
Tues Oct 7, 2014
2:45 – 4:30
Su Yunsheng image Su Yunsheng
Urban planner

Su Yunsheng creates sustainable designs for the rapidly expanding cities of China, proving that speed doesn’t have to come at the expense of efficiency.

Taking a holistic view of the diverse interests of the urban community, Su Yunsheng seeks a delicate balance between designers, developers, politicians and citizens to bind urban cities into smart, sustainable and energy-efficient spaces. In Yunsheng’s view, technology like the automobile “broke the time and space of the city.” But he believes that technology, whether it’s data mining for energy patterns or building with modular materials, will rehabilitate the urban environment.

He's the Chief engineer of the Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute, he was a planning consultant for the Shanghai 2010 World Expo, and is a co-founder of the Etopia construction platform. He also played a role in launching the influential Urban China Magazine.

Session 5: Urban Canvas
Wed Oct 8, 2014
11:30 – 1:20
d
Asha de Vos image Asha de Vos
Protector of whales

Dedicated to increasing awareness about Northern Indian Ocean blue whales, Asha de Vos is also committed to inspiring the next generation of marine biologists.

Asha de Vos is a marine biologist and TED Fellow who specializes in researching and working with marine mammals. She has degrees from the Universities of St. Andrews and Oxford, and her PhD from the University of Western Australia. She oversees the Sri Lankan Blue Whale Project, the first long-term study on blue whales within the northern Indian Ocean.

A Duke University Global Fellow in Marine Conservation, de Vos previously worked at the International Union for the Conservation of Nature while she has also consulted with the National Aquatic Research Agency. She was a panelist at the Rio+20 summit in Rio de Janeiro in 2012.
TED Fellows Talks: Session 1
Mon Oct 6, 2014
12:00 – 1:30